Teach Yourself Vector Graphics

I taught myself to create these creepy treats in an afternoon. Try it for yourself!

Welcome back! I put out new content every Wednesday, focusing on whatever is distracting me at the the time.

As a dedicated dabbler-in-everything, I find distraction is the best method for working towards better mental health. I dream up new hobbies I want to dabble in every day. The nice thing about having a blog is that I have somewhere to share my doodles, dabbles, and daydreams – even if I never do them again, I can at least share my progress for a fellow novice to stumble upon. I hope what such a person would get from this is to realise that if I can do it, then they can do it.

What are vector graphics?


From Wiki: Vector graphics are computer graphics images that are defined in terms of 2D points, which are connected by lines and curves to form polygons and other shapes.

The main difference between vector and raster graphics is that raster graphics are composed of pixels, while vector graphics are composed of paths. A raster graphic, such as a gif or jpeg, is an array of pixels of various colors, which together form an image. Vector graphics are best for printing since it is composed of a series of mathematical curves. As a result vector graphics print crisply even when they are enlarged. (GeeksforGeeks)

Ankit Jain, GeeksforGeeks


I hope the author doesn’t mind me quoting them, but they’ve explained it so simply that even I understood it (or gained a basic overview). Please click the links to learn about them in more depth – it’s an interesting read.

For now, onto the creativity!

Doughnut, minus cute-face.

Teach Yourself Vector Artwork

Vector graphics are amazing because you can create clean, crisp, beautiful images which can be scaled up or down with ease and printed in multiple sizes without ever deteriorating in quality. You can create multi-purpose artwork to use on a variety of print or digital materials, or you can even sell your own artwork for use on other people’s products.

Once you’ve gotten used to the basics, you can create basically anything you want. If you can make it out of shapes, then you can create it.

Tools

You will need a computer fast enough to not die on you while you’re creating, and an amazing and completely free piece of graphics software called Inkscape.
There is of course Photoshop and other expensive bits of kit, but if you’re new to this then you won’t want to shell out hundreds of pounds or dollars for what could be something you merely dabble in from time to time.

Inkscape is universally acknowledged as a fantastic (free!) bit of kit which people often choose over the expensive alternatives, not just because it’s free, but because they love to use it.

You can get Inkscape here.

After that, all you need is time, eagerness, and:

Tutorials


The easiest way to get to grips with your first piece of vector artwork is to follow a step-by-step tutorial in the art style you’re hoping to go for.

I was attracted to this amazing video by Logos by Nick on Youtube.

The above doughnut was created after I followed this tutorial! That doughnut was my very first piece of vector artwork. There are hundreds of tutorials out there, but this one was fast, fluid, and easy to follow. I even felt confident enough to add my own accents, such as the eyes and mouth, to give it some character.

If you take a look at the cute-face lollipop next to it, you will see the creation I made on my own directly after creating the step-by-step doughnut. I was amazed how fast I picked it up, and I was able to give my little doughnut buddy a creepy cute-face friend.

I didn’t touch Inkscape much again for the next year (because of personal crap) but when I picked it up again, it didn’t take long for me to get used to it.

I created two characters of mine, Meloncholy & Charlotte, who I dreamed up about 10 years ago at university. They were the subjects of many hand-drawn cartoons and poems.
(Copyright Ashleigh Condon)

What I learned

Aside from the technical skills involved in developing a piece of vector artwork, there’s a lot to learn about perspectives and the way we put images together.

For example, that doughnut appears to be a ring with a whole in the middle, correct? But it isn’t. It’s a white circle on top of a beige circle. Those bites out of the side of the doughnut are simply layers of circles detracted from two other layers of circles at different intervals to reveal those layers, thus making it look like a bite.

This might sound obvious and simple, but the beauty of vector artwork is that it’s all about the illusion.

You are not drawing. You are building up layers of shapes and manipulating how those shapes appear.

This means you can create absolutely anything as long as you can imagine it as a series of shapes.

Nifty, eh?

I hate to sound like Neil Buchanan (and by hate, I mean love), but try it yourself!

Best wishes,
Ashleigh

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